Essay Examples On A Raisin In The Sun

Essay Examples On A Raisin In The Sun

Two years after its Broadway premiere, “A Raisin in the Sun” appeared in movie theaters, starring Sidney Poitier and Ruby Dee. In the trailer for the 1961 film, the producer David Susskind provides a lengthy introduction that describes the awards the play received and the importance of its story before any scenes from the movie are shown. We match this scene from “Raisin” with a 2013 article on the present state and persistence of housing discrimination in the United States.

a raisin in the sun theme essay

The play ends with the Youngers moving out of the tenement, heading for the suburbs, despite every indication that their fellow Americans will not welcome them. Mama Lena is the last to exit the apartment, and her pensive farewell serves as a prelude to a future of offstage malevolence. Insulted by this “civil” effort to keep his family out of the neighborhood, Walter Lee declines. However, he theme of bartleby the scrivener later realizes he has been swindled out of every penny entrusted to him, having given it to an acquaintance who promised to speed up the liquor license process and then skipped town. He invites Lindner back and rehearses a speech to accept the humiliating offer. The progress of each character’s thinking in ‘A Raisin in the Sun’ by the end of the play.

Report & Essay

Note that when Beneatha’s African suitor, Asagai, is on his way to the Younger apartment, Beneatha gives her mother a hasty briefmg on African history, coaching her mother in conversational protocol. She tells Mama that Asagai is from Nigeria, which Mama immediately confuses with Liberia. After correcting her, Beneatha begs Mama not to make stereotypical comments about Africans and tells her that the only thing that most people seem to know about Africa has been learned from Tarzan movies. Beneatha berates those missionaries who, like Mama, are more concerned with changing the African’s religion than in overthrowing colonial rule. Afrocentrism, or the expression of pride in one’s African heritage, so popular among the black youth of the 1990s, was, in 1959, a little-known phenomenon. But Lorraine Hansberry’s affinity for all things African resulted from the people of greatness that she was acquainted with through her family.

Walter Lee shows a type of pride that could be called “manly” pride. A Raisin in the Sun realistically presents the struggles of the oppressed class against a privileged majority working to maintain society’s status quo. Hansberry also addresses the personal crutches we sometimes use to justify our own failures. Her main theme focuses on the power of the family structure and the need to stand up to injustice.

The Value And Purpose Of Dreams

However, she conveys the message that money is not life, as Walter claimed it was. Rather, family, pride in yourself, and pursuing your dreams are the things that are really important. The character that seems to express this view the closest is Mama. In Act I Mama tells Beneatha, “There is always something left to love. Even after all the mistakes Walter has made, Mama shows that love for your family, not money holds greater value.

  • Raisin in the sun by Lorraine Hansberry is truly moving piece that takes its readers into lives of an African American family in the 1950s.
  • Many comparisons metaphorically are made throughout the story to symbolize the state of certain situations such as the marriage.
  • Even though she’s a girl, Beneatha wants to be a doctor, to have high education and to marry a nice man.
  • In A Raisin in the Sun, the power of money regarding social stature and dignity is also presented.
  • Mama is the head of the household where she lives with her son Walter and wife Ruth with their son Travis along with Walter\’s sister Beneatha or Bennie as some like to call her.

I believe that Beneatha gave up on her dreams because she was afraid. Afraid that she would not get too far or accomplish everything that she wanted accomplish. Beneatha was afraid that despite her achievement she would still fail. In the beginning of the play, it is straightened and halfway through the play, she cuts it to an afro. The afro, another symbol of nature represents her embracing her natural heritage. It can be seen here that this powerful social statement has been controlled by nature-her natural hair.

The phrase “fluidly adapted” supports the idea that melodramas focus on real issues, their characters caricatures of the men and women of the time in which they are based, a method of commenting on our ever-changing society through entertainment. Before analysing and comparing the genre which links these two films, it is important to note the periods in which they were set and made, and the social constructions behind both their main themes and their characters’ actions. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn was made in 1945, the year in which the Second World War ended.

Lorraine Hansberry

She makes it clear to Ruth that she doesn’t understand how anyone could have married someone like Walter. And she defies her mother on religious points; in fact, Mama has to slap Beneatha before she will back down. However, after Mama has left the room, Beneatha still says to Ruth that there is no God. Pride in “A Raisin in the Sun” In the play “A Raisin in the Sun”, by Lorraine Hansberry, pride is one of the major themes. Several of the characters display their own particular kind of pride.

Leave A Reply